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2010 

Medicare Part B
Monthly Premiums

Medicare Part B
2011 Monthly Premiums

Medicare Part B premiums for 2011 are based on your 2009 (Yes, 2009) income. If you didn't file an income tax return for 2009, your income tax return for 2008 is used by the Social Security Administration to tally your Medicare Part B premium for 2011.

Social Security Administration quote:  "If your income has decreased since 2009, you can ask that the income from a more recent tax year be used to determine your premium, but you must meet certain criteria."

You Pay

If your Yearly Income is:

If your Yearly Income is:

 

Single

Married Couple

$96.40
or
$110.50

or
$115.40*

$85,000 or fewer

$170,000 or fewer

$161.50

$85,0001-$107,000 $170,001-$214,000

$230.70

$107,001-$160,000 $214,001-$320,000

$299.90

$160,001-$214,000 $320,001-$428,000

$369.10

Above $214,000 Above $428,000

You Pay

If You Are married and lived with your spouse at some time during the taxable year but you file a separate tax return from your spouse and your yearly income is:

$96.40
or
$110.50
or
$115.40*

$85,000 or fewer

$299.90 $85,001-$129,000
$369.10 Above $129.000

*You pay $96.40 if you were receiving Social Security Retirement benefits before January 1, 2010. 

You pay $110.50  if you started receiving Social Security Retirement benefits from January 1, 2010. 

You pay $115.40 if you started receiving Social Security Retirement benefits from January 1, 2011.

2011 Maximum Allowable Income

In 2011, if you are collecting Social Security Retirement benefits and you are under retirement age, your annual maximum allowable income without losing $1 for every $2 earned is $14,180 except in the year in which you attain retirement age. In the year in which you attain retirement age, you may earn $37,680 in the months before your birthday.  After that, there is no income limit.  If you earn more than $37,680 during the months before your birthday in the year you attain retirement age, you lose $1 for every $3 earned.

Medicare Part B
2010 Monthly Premiums

Medicare Part B premiums are based on income.  If you filed an individual tax return for 2008 (Yes, 2008) and had a modifed adjusted gross income below $85,001, and if you were receiving Social Security by December 31, 2009, the monthly premium deducted from your Social Security check in 2010 is $96.40: If  you started receiving Social Security from January 1, 2010, your 2010 monthly premium is $110.50.   If you didn't file for 2008, your tax return for 2007 was used by the Social Security Administration to tally your Medicare Part B/Original Medicare premium for 2010.

Social Security Administration quote:  "If your income has decreased since 2008, you can ask that the income from a more recent tax year be used to determine your premium."

You Pay

If your Yearly Income is:

If your Yearly Income is:

 

Single

Married Couple

$96.40
or
$110.50*

$85,000 or fewer

$170,000 or fewer

$154.70

$85,0001-$107,000 $170,001-$214,000
$221.00 $107,001-$160,000 $214,001-$320,000
$287.30 $160,001-$214,000 $320,001-$428,000
$353.60 Above $214,000 Above $428,000

You Pay

If You Are Married and Lived With Your Spouse at Some Time During the Taxable Year but You File a Separate Tax Return From Your Spouse and Your Yearly Income is:

$96.40
or
$110.50*

$85,000 or fewer

$287.30 $85,001-$129,000
$353.60 Above $129,000

*You pay $96.40 if you were receiving Social Security Retirement benefits before January 1, 2010.  You pay $110.50  if you started receiving Social Security Retirement benefits from January 1, 2010.

2010 Maximum Allowable Income

In 2010, if you are collecting Social Security Retirement benefits and you are under retirement age, your annual maximum allowable income without losing $1 for every $2 earned is $14,180 except in the year in which you attain retirement age. In the year in which you attain retirement age, you may earn $37,680 in the months before your birthday.  After that, there is no income limit.  If you earn more than $37,680 during the months before your birthday in the year you attain retirement age, you lose $1 for every $3 earned.

Medicare Part B

2009 Monthly Premiums

Medicare Part B premiums are based on income.  If you filed an individual tax return for 2007 (Yes, 2007) and had a modifed adjusted gross income below $85,001, the monthly premium deducted from your Social Security check in 2009 was $96.40.  If you didn't file for 2007, your tax return for 2006 was used by the Social Security Administration to tally your Medicare Part B/Original Medicare premium for 2009.

You Pay

If your Yearly Income is:

If your Yearly Income is:

 

Single

Married Couple

$96.40

$85,000 or fewer $170,000 or fewer

$134.90

$85,0001-$107,000 $170,001-$214,000
$192.70 $107,001-$160,000 $214,001-$320,000
$250.50 $160,001-$213,000 $320,001-$426,000
$308.30 Above $213,000 Above $426,000

You Pay

If You Are Married but You File a Separate Tax Return From Your Spouse and Your Yearly Income is:

$96.40

$85,000 or fewer

$250.50 $85,0001-$128,000
$308.30 Above $128,000

2009 Maximum Allowable Income

In 2009, if you were collecting Social Security Retirement benefits and you were under the retirement age, your annual maximum allowable income without losing $1 for every $2 earned was $14,180 except in the year in which you attained retirement age.  In the year in which you attained retirement age, you could have earned $36,680 in the months before your birthday.  After that, there was no income limit.  If you earned more than $36,680 during the months before your birthday in the year you attained retirement age, you lost $1 for every $3 earned.